If history judges this to be a golden age of television overflowing with magnificent creations and w

Publish Date : 2021-01-24


If history judges this to be a golden age of television overflowing with magnificent creations and w

If history judges this to be a golden age of television overflowing with magnificent creations and wonderful spectacle, then Call My Agent! will be considered among the epoch's Crown Jewels.

The exquisitely crafted, beautifully written, brilliantly acted French comedy-drama series about life in a Parisian talent agency is close to perfection, unlike its protagonists who are marvellously flawed.

The show, which started in 2015, has developed over four series and five years from a cult hit into a lockdown sensation.

Season Four has just launched on Netflix, which will be the programme's last hurrah apparently. Let's hope the producers' word is as reliable as the double-crossing, endlessly conniving mavericks running the fictional ASK agency. It would be a great shame to consign such a fabulous cast of unbelievably believable, loveably unlovable characters to the back-catalogue just when they've become a core part of so many people's on-screen friendship group.

If you don't know them, let me introduce you:

There is the scheming but charming Mathias Barneville (Thibault de Montalembert), the agency's senior pro, whose attitude to the film industry is "either you eat everyone else, or you get eaten".

A little way along the agency's glass-fronted corridor is the good-natured but slightly hopeless Gabriel Sarda (Grégory Montel), who cannot bear to give his actors any bad news or lie to their faces, which is a serious shortcoming in the talent management game.

"Who's talking about lying?" asks his boss, "Simply don't tell the truth."
Set apart, in an office around the back is Arlette Azémar (Liliane Rovère), the oldest agent in France, a grand dame who considers herself more of an "impresario". Je l'adore, but she is mocked behind her back by colleagues who claim "she negotiated the contracts for the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park".

Making up the quartet of ASK's wheeling-dealing ten-percent merchants (the French title of the show is Dix pour Cent - ten percent) is the formidable Andréa Martel (Camille Cottin), a kick-ass negotiator who doesn't suffer fools, or anybody else for that matter, unless they happen to be a film star or an attractive young woman looking for a good time without strings.
If history judges this to be a golden age of television overflowing with magnificent creations and wonderful spectacle, then Call My Agent! will be considered among the epoch's Crown Jewels.

The exquisitely crafted, beautifully written, brilliantly acted French comedy-drama series about life in a Parisian talent agency is close to perfection, unlike its protagonists who are marvellously flawed.

The show, which started in 2015, has developed over four series and five years from a cult hit into a lockdown sensation.

Season Four has just launched on Netflix, which will be the programme's last hurrah apparently. Let's hope the producers' word is as reliable as the double-crossing, endlessly conniving mavericks running the fictional ASK agency. It would be a great shame to consign such a fabulous cast of unbelievably believable, loveably unlovable characters to the back-catalogue just when they've become a core part of so many people's on-screen friendship group.

If you don't know them, let me introduce you:

There is the scheming but charming Mathias Barneville (Thibault de Montalembert), the agency's senior pro, whose attitude to the film industry is "either you eat everyone else, or you get eaten".

A little way along the agency's glass-fronted corridor is the good-natured but slightly hopeless Gabriel Sarda (Grégory Montel), who cannot bear to give his actors any bad news or lie to their faces, which is a serious shortcoming in the talent management game.

"Who's talking about lying?" asks his boss, "Simply don't tell the truth."
Set apart, in an office around the back is Arlette Azémar (Liliane Rovère), the oldest agent in France, a grand dame who considers herself more of an "impresario". Je l'adore, but she is mocked behind her back by colleagues who claim "she negotiated the contracts for the dinosaurs in Jurassic Park".

Making up the quartet of ASK's wheeling-dealing ten-percent merchants (the French title of the show is Dix pour Cent - ten percent) is the formidable Andréa Martel (Camille Cottin), a kick-ass negotiator who doesn't suffer fools, or anybody else for that matter, unless they happen to be a film star or an attractive young woman looking for a good time without strings.

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